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Etymology: appreciating word origins

r/etymology

Discussing the origins of words and phrases, in English or any other language. USEFUL RESOURCES: etymonline.com, wiktionary.org, oed.com (get access through your local library or institution), books.google.com/ngrams, trends.google.com

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Created on 06 Feb 2009
45
Posted by u/dnq-ink
In Turkish, önce means once.
2 Comments Share Save
61
Posted by u/CitizenKeen
Origin of 'emperox' - Scalzi?
17 Comments Share Save
0
Posted by u/Crazy8slates
Hippocratic Oath and Hypocrite. Similar?
3 Comments Share Save
172
Posted by u/ZobozZoboz
The revered, deadly beasts loved gonorrhea – Venus, venerate, venereal and more
9 Comments Share Save
325
Posted by u/ZtheGM
TIL “frig” is not a minced oath
40 Comments Share Save
3
Posted by u/AnthonyJackalTrades
Saw this commented by u/megadecimal, thought it was too close to controversial to trust my own fact checking.
4 Comments Share Save
462
Posted by u/Jay_377
I've heard that birds get different group names for species. Why did this happen, and why only birds?
82 Comments Share Save
4
Posted by u/Annuuuhhh
Origi of North Macedonias abbreviation (MKD)?
5 Comments Share Save
6
Posted by u/Infinite_Degree1091
Divulge = "apart" + "common people"
1 Comments Share Save
7
Posted by u/Infinite_Degree1091
Skulk, Swedish skolka "to shirk, skulk, slink, play truant."
2 Comments Share Save
71
Posted by u/GMOsYMMV
MIckey Mouse is known around the world, and generally considered a well-loved character. Why is calling something "mickey mouse" an insult?
36 Comments Share Save
160
Posted by u/mtmichael
Words/names that literally mean "I don't know"
61 Comments Share Save
6
Posted by u/MadQuixote
"Bat out of hell"
2 Comments Share Save
5
Posted by u/vmos
Why do americans say "off of" ?
15 Comments Share Save
2
Posted by u/itsmtthw
Bouillotte
2 Comments Share Save
277
Posted by u/Ok_Attorney_4114
I’m not an etymology person, so I don’t know the terminology, but what’s y’all’s favorite word that should mean the opposite of what it means based on its origins
236 Comments Share Save
1
Posted by u/ChairmanJim
Where did xtal come from, shorthand for a crystal oscillator.
2 Comments Share Save
3
Posted by u/AceTheBot
Weird question: Is there any specific reason so many adjectives being used as nouns is derogatory?
5 Comments Share Save
9
Posted by u/Baelzebubba
Came across this
1 Comments Share Save
0
Posted by u/TheyWhoHaveAnOpinion
Narrowing of the meaning of slur
4 Comments Share Save
298
Posted by u/Infinite_Degree1091
Gloat = Old Norse glotta "to grin, smile scornfully and show the teeth,"
16 Comments Share Save
13
Posted by u/Infinite_Degree1091
Marinade = "seawater"
3 Comments Share Save
2
Posted by u/zvlastnivec
Do fascism and the American homophobic slur fa**** share a common Latin cognate in fasces?
5 Comments Share Save
2
Posted by u/OppositeDirt
Spalted [links in comments]
1 Comments Share Save
43
Posted by u/OppositeDirt
Venison now refers primarily to the meat of elk or deer (or antelope in South Africa). The word derives from the Latin venari, meaning to hunt or pursue.
6 Comments Share Save
21
Posted by u/WiseZebrafish
When or how did French language came up with its "oi"(wa) sound? It sound so different from other Romance languages but still it is so consistent.
20 Comments Share Save
500
Posted by u/dhruveishp
Different names of Greece
47 Comments Share Save
2
Posted by u/FlatAssembler
Is the name "Varivode", where Varivode Massacre 1995 happened, related to the ancient name of the near-by town of Bribir, Varvaria? Or is it related to the Croatian word "variti" (to cook)?
0 Comments Share Save
70
Posted by u/LanaDelHeeey
We really need an r/BadEtymology to post stuff like this
17 Comments Share Save
0
Posted by u/linguacallidus
What is the etymology of cheugy?
5 Comments Share Save
2
Posted by u/TwentyFour7
How did the name “Juneteenth” come to be?
5 Comments Share Save
62
Posted by u/komandanto_en_bovajo
Theophoric ("god-bearing") names
32 Comments Share Save
570
Posted by u/pstamato
Naught, from Old English "nawiht," or "no wight;" Wight meant "creature, thing." So "naught" is just literally an older way of saying "No thing," or "Nothing."
58 Comments Share Save
15
Posted by u/readysetgettit
When did people start calling June 19th "Juneteenth"?
6 Comments Share Save
2
Posted by u/Infinite_Degree1091
Ceremony "a conventional usage of politeness, formality."
1 Comments Share Save
3
Posted by u/beardwithablog
Thinking about the word, “phony”, also “phoney”, as in, not genuine…
2 Comments Share Save
8
Posted by u/DEAF_BEETHOVEN
Does anyone know why there was a spike in the 1920's with the word 'Aeolian'?
14 Comments Share Save
3
Posted by u/BlisterJazz
Thought you guys might be able to help out?
1 Comments Share Save
3
Posted by u/Jonlang_
r/CelticLinguistics is open for business
2 Comments Share Save
392
Posted by u/wattnurt
"Asymptote" and "symptom" share the same root because in one, things fall together (the symptom and its cause), and the other they never fall together (the two lines that never meet)
12 Comments Share Save
1
Posted by u/GiomAplolinair
pstruh/pstrąg
2 Comments Share Save
3
Posted by u/-Geistzeit
"The Book and the Beech Tree Revisited: The Life Cycle of a Germanic Etymology" (Marc Pierce, 2006, Historische Sprachforschung / Historical Linguistics). Solid if brief discussion regarding etymologies of "book" and "rune". Includes interesting discussion on the Grimms, runic magic, and philology.
1 Comments Share Save
4
Posted by u/Rainduck84
‘Qu’ sound in British English
18 Comments Share Save
9
Posted by u/lastuseravailable
Both pronounced as bolth
5 Comments Share Save
4
Posted by u/Infinite_Degree1091
Darning is "action or process of mending a hole (in fabric) by interweaving yarn or thread" ?
1 Comments Share Save
2
Posted by u/reverser1911
can I get a scholarship or funding for studying etymology?
3 Comments Share Save
20
Posted by u/wattnurt
How come Spanish borrowed so many Germanic first names? (Alberto, Heriberto, Adolfo etc)
10 Comments Share Save
269
Posted by u/drake_lazarus
Favourite minced oaths?
149 Comments Share Save
1
Posted by u/Infinite_Degree1091
Rhythm = "measured flow or movement, rhythm; proportion, symmetry; arrangement, order; form, shape, wise, manner; soul, disposition"
1 Comments Share Save
2
Posted by u/mjoseff
The Interesting Etymology Behind 70 Words
1 Comments Share Save