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Cake day

15 Aug 2019
1
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 1 day
Video by: [@richardsidey](https://www.instagram.com/richardsidey/)
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3
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 1 day
From the people who made the video: >"MJ didn't have the best start in life. Her mother was killed for meat, and she experienced it happening -- the fall, being taken in as a pet .. all of it, which left her confused in this world. She was so young, and needed a mother figure before we were able to introduce her to other monkeys that could later fill that role for her.. or at least help to fill that role. > >Once MJ felt safe and comforted, she would cling to us through the day as we did chores and research. She was too young to be kept in an enclosure alone. After a few weeks, MJ was transferred to be with a larger group of young spider monkeys, with whom she will be reintroduced to the wild. > >This video shows MJ's first day with us at the Center, where she met and fell in love with granadilla and many other jungle fruits!" Video by: sjzwicker (IG)
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4
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 1 day
Video by: [trcabroad](https://www.instagram.com/p/CLOp7ivMXtS/)
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5
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 1 day
Video by: [trcabroad](https://www.instagram.com/p/CLOp7ivMXtS/)
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1
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 1 day
Photo by: [primalshutter](https://www.instagram.com/primalshutter/)
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6
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 1 day
Video by: [richardsidey](https://instagram.com/richardsidey?igshid=9mlzdjpgbmbq)
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3
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 days
Video by: [australianreptilepark](https://www.instagram.com/australianreptilepark/)
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16
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 days
Video by: [boxlapsefilms](https://instagram.com/boxlapsefilms?igshid=1lg5z6i8kd4ry)
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4
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 days
For anyone who doesn't speak Finnish perkele is roughly equivalent to "God damn."
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7
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 3 days
Photo by: [npekonen](https://www.instagram.com/npekonen/)
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2
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 3 days
Photo by: [nikola\_rahme](https://www.instagram.com/nikola_rahme/)
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9
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 3 days
Video by: [ogasawara_marine_centre](https://instagram.com/ogasawara_marine_centre?igshid=1rvybfd1t4dla)
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5
Posted by u/fojteflon 4 days
Your talent is incredible! The post here is remarkable, but those faces blew me away. I don't care what anyone says you're not wasting your skills on anything. Breathtaking.
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3
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 4 days
Photo by: [nikola\_rahme](https://www.instagram.com/nikola_rahme/)
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21
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 4 days
That seems intuitive but you're not comparing the same things. There is no shortage of non-flammable compounds. No matter what you mix with many flame retardants they simply will not become highly flammable. Even if you soak them in gasoline only the gasoline is highly flammable, which is exactly the same as your example. The water is not highly flammable due to being mixed with gasoline, the gasoline is actually less flammable because of the dilution by adding water. Ammonia nor the secretion is highly flammable on their own. Ammonia stored in massive quantities can explode when exposed to excessive heat, but it's not highly flammable in a standard setting.
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3
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 5 days
That's an interesting point. I would be curious how often a polar bear drowns on that journey. I would imagine it's a more frequent occurrence in modern times.
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3
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 5 days
Photo by: [macro_roshan](https://instagram.com/macro_roshan?igshid=xj3arayzbjat)
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Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 5 days
Yes, while ice loss is potentially an extinction level threat polar bears normally swim unbelievable distances. One of the longest recorded distances is over 425 miles straight.
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21
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 5 days
From the photographer: >Although it looks strange to see polar bears on red rocks, I photographed these mother and cub in the wild on the shores of the Hudson Bay in Canada. After the sea ice melted in summer, they swam to shore, where they would needed to await for the return of the ice, so they can head out to hunt for seals yet again. I watched them for several hours as they rested after their long 100km swim. Video by: [florianschulzvisuals](https://www.instagram.com/florianschulzvisuals/)
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Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 6 days
Video by: [johnny\_gaskell](https://www.instagram.com/johnny_gaskell/)
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2
Posted by u/[deleted] 6 days
It looks like you're right, and we can't have that incorrect title up there. Thank you.
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1
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 6 days
Photo by: [khalid.alhadrami](https://www.instagram.com/khalid.alhadrami/)
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1
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 1 week
My pleasure.
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4
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 1 week
The video is 100% theirs, but they're not their pets. They breed insects for various purposes, and they're very good at it. They're the first people in the world to breed this particular species.
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3
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 1 week
Video by: [ennisanna\_fei](https://www.instagram.com/ennisanna_fei/)
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1
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 1 week
If comments like the ones you describe are seen or reported they are removed. While people are omnivores we don't tolerate the "mmm bacon" comments, but we can't read ever comment so some will be get by us.
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Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 1 week
I love the sounds they make!
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3
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 1 week
Video by: [sandiegozoo](https://www.instagram.com/reel/CLm8GdXArdi/?igshid=1wpvdche5isij)
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2
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 1 week
That would be a strange combination of scary and amazing. I'm all for it.
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38
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 1 week
That's fantastic! I posted it on a whim because I saw it on IG again and I've always loved it. My title is unintentionally misleading because it implies this behavior is similar to an opossum, but in reality the mongoose is literally playing with the hornbill. One thing that's been cemented in me working as a wildlife veterinarian who has all over the world is that the animals we share this planet with largely have the same variation of individualism, the same love of play, and we're only beginning to learn the depth of their intelligence. Here's a short YouTube video by [National Geographic](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BjkuMFZBJ3k) that explains the interaction well.
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5
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 1 week
Yes, this is negatively affecting many aspects of the buck's life, the ability to avoid predation being the significant. The buck certainly has a strong neck thanks to evolution, but even with that it will become taxing. This is especially true in winter where food may be limited and calories cherished. Humans will get involved in America if possible. It's situationally dependant. You have to evaluate the larger picture, which often doesn't end up the way we'd like. Given the time of year, and his ability to forage normally, he very well could make it to spring.
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7
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 1 week
Photo by: [cygnustech](https://www.instagram.com/cygnustech/)
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3
Posted by u/End-O-Days 1 week
One of my life goals is to see one of these beautiful bears in the wild... From a distance.
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66
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 1 week
Yes, you're right. It's impossible for a buck to rip the head off of another living buck. Even if they break the neck of the other buck they're not ripping the head off. The title was intended to be humorous because I never thought people would think it was possible to do that. The Curse of Knowledge cognitive bias in full effect. Source: I'm a wildlife veterinarian Edit: spelling is hard
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6
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 1 week
There are only a few scenarios that this can happen, and all of then involve a "fight" with a dead buck. You're right that at some point the buck had to pull that portion from the corpse of the other deer, probably twisting.
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98
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 1 week
There is good news. According to the person who recorded the image the buck was seen grazing normally, which means the other rack will fall off when they shed their antlers in the spring. Video by: [journey_to_inspiration](https://instagram.com/journey_to_inspiration?igshid=s9x3vovhchkd)
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3
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 1 week
Haha, that's great. It's the latter, but I suppose it could be both.
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1
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 1 week
When turtles are shocked—or stunned—by cold weather they lose the ability to move properly, floating to the top of the water. The medical term for this is hypothermic, and it can lead to any number of possible deaths, including predation and boat strikes. The people at Sea Turtle Inc., along with the other volunteers did a remarkable thing for these animals. Video by: savethereef (IG) and seaturtleinctx (IG) Edit: There were over 2,200 sea turtles successfully released.
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3
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 1 week
Photo by: [morries\_lky](https://www.instagram.com/morries_lky/)
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61
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 1 week
>This video is of Loki, our young male margay. Since he came to me so young, we were able to develop a bond similar to that of his biological mother. Loki follows me into the jungle, where he is able to adventure, play, and navigate the canopy under supervision. As he grows older, he will begin to climb and experience the jungle further and further from me, gaining the skills necessary to survive on his own little by little. One day he will become fully wild and independent like Keanu. Video by: [sjzwicker](https://www.instagram.com/p/CLkXRPcBDGM/)
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11
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 1 week
You didn't agree with me, but that's perfectly fine. I don't think your comment was malicious, and I even removed both of our follow-up comments and let your original stay because of this fact. I was happy to let the original comment stand, along with the entitlement that went along with it. What I was pointing out to you was that the idea of it being "too bad" is exactly the problem. It's that type of thinking that helped lead to the Spix's macaw becoming extinct in the wild, along with the untold suffering of many other species. Where you're going wrong is ignoring the fact that saying it's "too bad" reinforces the idea of human entitlement over the lives of non-human animals. It's not "too bad" they can't be pets, it's wonderful and nobody should want to make them pets. There should be no desire for making cute or beautiful animals pets. Cats and dogs serve a mutually beneficial role with humans, but they suffer greatly at our hands, as well. That said, they are good companions. Spamming the comments isn't going to do anything good for you. There's literally no reason for it.
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7
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 1 week
Photo by: [sumit\_wildlife\_photos](https://www.instagram.com/sumit_wildlife_photos/)
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2
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 1 week
Video by: [wannabe\_entomologist](https://www.instagram.com/wannabe_entomologist/)
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Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 1 week
Video by: [trentsizemore](https://www.instagram.com/trentsizemore/)
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5
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 1 week
Photo by: [giannisarg\_](https://www.instagram.com/giannisarg_/)
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3
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 1 week
Agreed. She said there was something playing in the background that made her have to mute it.
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2
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 1 week
Video by: [ennisanna\_fei](https://www.instagram.com/ennisanna_fei/)
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32
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 1 week
I don't know the exact age but they are very young. Adult emus are between 80-90 pounds and roughly 5 feet tall on average.
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336
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 1 week
These emus are not pets. The video was created by Paige Davis (@pythonpaige IG) who works for a bird sanctuary.
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5
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 weeks
Video by: [ennisanna\_fei](https://www.instagram.com/ennisanna_fei/)
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Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 weeks
Video by: [robertoochoahe](https://www.instagram.com/robertoochoahe/)
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Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 weeks
No problem! I'm glad it's what you were looking for.
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7
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 weeks
As a rule birds should be sedated before this type of handling. There are circumstances where sedation may not be used but it reduces stress and makes the everything easier. There are different levels of sedation, but I can't say for certain what they used here. This is part of a general exam. This is done to ensure that everything is functioning as it should be. Think of it as reflex test given by your GP.
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7
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 weeks
If you're looking for a general overview that's not overly "medical" [this is a decent read with diagrams and a couple gifs.](https://helpfulharrie.tumblr.com/post/190131154981/the-mechanism-of-grasp/amp)
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67
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 weeks
Yes, it does look painful, especially when the person is straining so much to open their feet. That's only because of how powerful these birds of prey are. In reality it probably feels quite good to the birds.
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17
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 weeks
Sort of, but I would say that if we want to be more accurate it's better to understand it as a series of flexor tendons that act as a pulley system. The pinnacle of this being a situation where the four toes are locked in place by this system. A ratchet isn't "incorrect" because it does allow more force to be applied, but it's an incomplete way to understand the forces at play. A locking vice grip clamp is probably a better way to look at it. Edit: formatting
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204
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 weeks
This is a normal part of veterinary medicine and in no way is it painful to the raptor. We (veterinarians) do these exams to ensure that their feet are working properly. This video was done by the wonderful people at the [americanbaldeaglefoundation](https://instagram.com/americanbaldeaglefoundation?igshid=u45f3cenpk25)
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3
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 weeks
Photo by: [davesandford](https://www.instagram.com/davesandford/)
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3
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 weeks
Video by: [batworldsanctuary](https://www.instagram.com/batworldsanctuary/)
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Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 weeks
Photo by: [saidkry2](https://www.instagram.com/saidkry2/)
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Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 weeks
Video by: [bringasdive](https://www.instagram.com/bringasdive/)
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1
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 weeks
Photo by: [macrochambers](https://www.instagram.com/macrochambers/)
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Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 weeks
Video via: [greensteading](https://www.instagram.com/greensteading/)
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Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 weeks
Video by: [onlyfishcontent](https://www.instagram.com/onlyfishcontent/)
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Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 weeks
No problem. Unfortunately the answer isn't satisfying. Relatively speaking science doesn't know a whole lot about these wonderful animals, yet. The person I spoke to watched the video and said there's no definitive answer they can give, but they believe it could be related to trying to keep their hind limbs free from injury. This was another, slightly more educated guess, but a guess just the same.
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4
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 weeks
This is just a guess on my part, but I would assume you're correct. Energy conservation seems like the most likely reason behind the intermittent use of the rear legs. Although I have to wonder if they exert more energy pulling their hole body rather than just using your rear legs? If I get time I will reach out to a veterinary colleague who works with reptiles and ask them.
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2
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 weeks
Video by: [secret.species](https://www.instagram.com/secret.species/)
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1
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 weeks
Video by: [diche\_mideros](https://www.instagram.com/diche_mideros/)
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2
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 weeks
Photo by: [mikasvet](https://www.instagram.com/mikasvet/)
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1
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 weeks
Video by: [chrisweeet](https://www.instagram.com/chrisweeet/)
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1
Posted by u/[deleted] 2 weeks
Photo by: chrisweeet (IG)
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2
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 weeks
Photo by: [yolcatzin.mx](https://www.instagram.com/yolcatzin.mx/)
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Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 weeks
Video by: [bbcnews](https://www.instagram.com/bbcnews/)
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1
Posted by u/[deleted] 2 weeks
Thanks for the info! I feel like the type of work you do is sustainable by the nature of the work itself. I have nothing against the idea of commercial fishing, though I do have a problem with corporations sending out multiple multi-million dollar vessels equipped with state of the art equipment that can identify the fish with precision yet they throw out massive long lines and bring in a ton of dead or dying fish that they never use, like you said. bottom trolling is a huge problem for me too because of the destruction it leaves behind. Back in the days when people did work like you do there were plenty of fish. You mentioned under 60 ft and I got the impression that that's "small" or "medium sized? 50 or 60 ft is huge to me but on the ocean I guess that's not that big. If I may ask, how many people work on a boat like yours? just to clarify I'm trying to find out how many people make a living on a boat similar to the size that you work on? How does that compare to one of the larger automated ships? I'm trying to figure out if more people make a living wage fishing the way you do or on the biggest and baddest of ships. I'm not going to lie, I'm fucking terrified of the open ocean. You have to have nerves of steel for that shit.
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15
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 weeks
Exactly. This is just simple playful behavior. As long as you avoid the inside edge on the sides of their bill there's little to fear from them. They're big goofballs.
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1
Posted by u/[deleted] 2 weeks
Please don't take this as being aggressive, it's genuine curiosity. Given the state of a large number the fisheries being overfished do you see anyway that the industry can transition to a more sustainable format? I don't know a great deal about commercial fishing, and I avoid the meme type of information sources, but it seems like it's driven largely by huge corporate fisheries. Is that true, or is it a lot of small fishing operations? This is a subject I'm fascinated by.
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2
Posted by u/[deleted] 2 weeks
You're right, small to midsize vessels are more likely to collide with larger marine life. I was addressing the part of the comment about how ships aren't going around killing animals. What most people forget is that the ocean is more than just large and medium sized marine life. Ships routinely decimate marine life in the form of copepods—shrimp-like crustaceans about the size of a grain of rice. These small animals feed on microscopic plant material and alga. They are vital to the food web of marine environments. Humans tend not to care about these creatures because they're tiny, but their role in a healthy ecosystem is undeniable. They are almost continually sucked into the propellers of all size vessels, which can and does disrupt a healthy ecosystem. As for sucking up larger marine life, ships do this as well. Harbor seals are a great example of what happens when larger wildlife are sucked into large props. They're also incidents of smaller oceanic dolphins being sucked into props, but it's difficult to confirm frequency because usually there's no visual evidence. Overall this doesn't happen often, as far as we know. I also agree that unless these animals can ride the momentum of the bow wave upon entering the water they're in big trouble.
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84
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 weeks
Shoebills are docile towards humans. While they can cause injury it's rare for them to show aggression during interactions with humans. Video by: [maimai\_hatuwe](https://www.instagram.com/maimai_hatuwe/)
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2
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 weeks
Photo by: [frankcanon\_image\_in](https://www.instagram.com/frankcanon_image_in/)
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Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 weeks
Photo by: [sascha.fonseca](https://www.instagram.com/sascha.fonseca/)
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38
Posted by u/cas2ie 2 weeks
Steve Irwin didn't always do things in the safest of ways—especially how he interacted with animals—but what he set out to do was to bring animals, and his passion for them, into our homes. He succeeded at that goal. He inspired an entire generation of conservationists and wildlife professionals, including myself. His early work was influential in my wanting to become a wildlife veterinarian. His parenting was done the same way. Some of the things he did you can reasonably question in terms of safety, but you can't deny the wonderful results of Steve and Terri's parenting.
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53
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 weeks
This is not a pet. The lizard was found outside where it was recorded and released. Video by: [maxs6461](https://www.instagram.com/maxs6461/)
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Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 weeks
I post animal content almost exclusively so I don't get this comment on my posts, but it's incredibly fitting here.
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7
Posted by u/[deleted] 2 weeks
I'm not sure why you doubt the willingness of corporations to murder wildlife, but you shouldn't. [Killing seals with propellers is nothing new](https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/feb/26/sea-deaths-ship-propellers-corkscrew), and in the waters surrounding the US [sea turtles don't fair very well.](https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/insight/understanding-vessel-strikes#how-often-do-vessels-strike-marine-animals?) It's also been known for a decade that [propeller turbulence interferes with marine food web,](https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110419111429.htm) yet that doesn't prevent them from continuing. Ships literally do cruise around killing wildlife. The idea that most people care about wildlife is sadly mistaken, but the idea that corporations do is laughable. Source: I'm a wildlife veterinarian
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361
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 weeks
This digital art by: [mvrc.t](https://www.instagram.com/p/CJgnZTFoQ2_/)
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Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 weeks
They are called the Florida Panther and I believe this was one of them. They are a subspecies and they're not quite extinct yet, but close.
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Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 weeks
Video by: [thereptilezoo](https://instagram.com/thereptilezoo?igshid=fhpxfzb1r24f)
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Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 2 weeks
Photo by: [naturphotography.lorbeer](https://www.instagram.com/naturphotography.lorbeer/)
1 Comments Share Save
1
Posted by u/[deleted] 3 weeks
Video by: [pythonpaige](https://instagram.com/pythonpaige?igshid=1m8kimet7prpo)
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Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 3 weeks
Video by: [diogomelo.photo](https://www.instagram.com/diogomelo.photo/)
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Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 3 weeks
Photo by: [frupus65](https://www.instagram.com/frupus65/)
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Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 3 weeks
Photo by: [djmossoro](https://www.instagram.com/djmossoro/)
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Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 3 weeks
Photo by: [ladzinski](https://www.instagram.com/ladzinski/)
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Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 3 weeks
It's a wonderful place, and one that stresses the importance of not handling their residents unless necessary.
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Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 3 weeks
Photo by: [cynthiabandurek\_artphotography](https://www.instagram.com/cynthiabandurek_artphotography/)
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Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 3 weeks
Video by: [Andrea Wipperfurth](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O16kGZ-Gm74)
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Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 3 weeks
Photo by: [dukelemurcenter](https://www.instagram.com/dukelemurcenter/)
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Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 3 weeks
Video by: [mark\_kostich\_photography](https://www.instagram.com/mark_kostich_photography/)
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Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 3 weeks
The loss of body parts is quite common. They go through anamorphic development, which means they grow new legs and body segments with each molt. Most species are also capable of regrowing lost legs.
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1
Posted by u/Drown_In_The_Void 3 weeks
VIdeo by: [frupus65](https://www.instagram.com/frupus65/)
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